Julie Moore’s Modesty

Here is the very simple and understated biography Julie Moore prepared
Julie Moore on the set of We Were Soldiers
Julie Moore on the set of We Were Soldiers

Julie Moore, wife of Lt. General Harold G. Moore and daughter of Colonel and Mrs. Louis J. Compton, both now deceased, was born in the army hospital at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma where her father a WW I and WW II Field Artillery combat veteran .was stationed.  She was educated at Chevy Chase Junior College in Maryland and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

She and Lt. Harold G. Moore were married in November 1949 and have five children and 12 grandchildren.  Two of their 3 sons followed their father as West Point graduates.

Wherever the family was stationed, Mrs. Moore served as a Brownie and Girl Scout Leader, Cub Scout Den Mother and as a Red Cross volunteer in army hospitals and dental clinics.  At every post she took special interest in improving and supporting Day Care Centers and worked with the wives clubs to help take better care of the enlisted soldier and his family.  She was very active in helping to create the Army Community Service Organization that is now a permanent fixture on all army posts.

It was in Columbus, Georgia, while then Lt. Col. Moore was in the First Cavalry Division in Vietnam, that she was busiest in helping the wives and families of his soldiers while their husbands were away; especially those whose husbands and fathers were killed or wounded in action.

Since General Moore’s retirement she has become his “administrative assistant” doing the typing for his book “We Were Soldiers Once — And Young” and his lectures, but still has plenty of time to enjoy gardening, reading and the Grandchildren.

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Please sign the petitions to rename Fort Benning and Fort Rucker

Whether you like the idea or not, federal law requires all bases named for Confederates be renamed.
Let’s help them make the right choice for Fort Benning and Fort Davis!
Beyond the individual contributions of Hal Moore, renaming Fort Benning also recognizes the equally important contributions of the military spouse and family.
His many accomplishments make General Davis deserving of this honor – even more so when you see how he had to overcome crushing prejudice to achieve greatness.

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